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Emergency Preparedness - Health Advisory

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H1N1 Flu

December 15, 2009 – Update

Student Health Center Makes H1N1 Vaccinations Available to Students, Faculty and Staff Dec. 15 and 17

With more than 1,000 doses of the H1N1 vaccine on hand, the CSULB Student Health Center is opening up the availability of the vaccinations to all students, faculty and staff in two vaccine clinics.

The health center will conduct a pair of clinics in SHS Room 118 today, Dec. 15, from 2–4 p.m., and Thursday, Dec. 17, from 8:30–11 a.m. and from 2–4 p.m.

Students, faculty and staff must have a valid CSULB identification card in order to take advantage of these clinics. The vaccinations will be available while supplies last.

For more information, contact the CSULB Student Health Center at:
562–985–4609.

December 11, 2009

Student Health Center to Make H1N1 Vaccinations Available to Faculty and Staff in Top Priority Groups

With more than 1,000 doses of the H1N1 vaccine on hand, the Cal State Long Beach Student Health Center is opening up the availability of the vaccinations to faculty and staff who fall within the Centers for Disease Control's (CDC) priority groups.

The health center will conduct a pair of clinics in SHS Room 118 on Tuesday, Dec. 15, and Thursday, Dec. 17, from 8:30-11 a.m. and from 2–4 p.m. on both days. The vaccinations will be available to students, faculty and staff who fall within the following priority groups:

Priority Groups

  • All individuals 24 years of age and younger;
  • Caretakers or household member of infants under 6 months of age;
  • Health care workers with direct patient contact;
  • Pregnant women;
  • Adults from 25–64 years of age with high risk medical conditions such as asthma, other lung diseases, diabetes, etc.;
  • Day care staff and teachers of preschool through 12th grade levels.

Students, faculty and staff must have a valid CSULB identification card in order to take advantage of these clinics. The vaccinations will be available while supplies last.

For more information, contact the CSULB Student Health Center at 562–985–4771.

October 29, 2009

News about the flu season is becoming a greater concern to our campus community, and we believe it would be helpful to provide information that may better clarify how flu-like cases are being addressed on campus. We also will take this opportunity to remind everyone that healthy behaviors should be practiced daily, especially during flu season.

An individual who is demonstrating flu-like symptoms, referred to as "Influenza-Like Illness" or ILI, should be isolated during the course of illness while proper caretaking and recovery is underway. Unless a patient falls into a high-risk category or is so ill that hospitalization is required, actual testing for H1N1 (also known as "swine flu") is not called for under Centers for Disease Control guidelines. Without actual testing, an individual case of H1N1 cannot be confirmed.

On our campus we are seeing an increase in students with ILI cases in the Student Health Center, although none of these have been confirmed as H1N1. We have also received word of two confirmed cases where students were recently hospitalized with H1N1. They were both released by their physicians to recover at home. Some students who live on campus have also complained of flu-like symptoms; the Residential Life staff is working with them to either go home or to move to another room where they can be isolated during the course of recovery.

CSULB has not yet received its allotment of the H1N1 vaccine. Distribution of the vaccine on campus will follow a defined priority plan: students living in university housing or in fraternity or sorority houses: student athletes; and students with chronic medical conditions such as asthma. Student Health Center and University Police employees will also be given priority status to receive the vaccine.

Students who do not fall into these priority categories, as well as faculty and staff, are encouraged to contact their individual health care providers to determine whether they should receive the H1N1 vaccine and how to arrange to do so. Many providers such as Kaiser Permanente and Blue Shield will have their own allotments of the vaccine for their members and patients, and each has its own distribution plan.

Because the campus will be closed Monday in observance of a State Budget Closure Day, the Student Health Center also will be closed. If you experience flu symptoms and you are in a high-risk group or are experiencing difficulty breathing or other complications, see your health care provider immediately. Otherwise, if you have flu-like symptoms in the next few days, please do not return to campus until you are no longer experiencing fever for at least 24 hours.

More information about CSULB's H1N1 vaccination plan, as well as extensive information available through the Centers for Disease Control, can be found at the Student Health Services Web site.

October 23, 2009

Arrival of H1N1 Flu Vaccine Delayed; CSULB Students with Flu-Like Illnesses Increasing, But No Major Outbreaks

Because of lower-than-expected yields in production of the H1N1 vaccine, Cal State Long Beach has not yet received its allotment of the vaccine for campus distribution.

The CSULB Student Health Center was expecting some 3,000 doses to arrive in mid-October, but now, center officials are anticipating 1,400 doses of the vaccine – 600 flu mist vaccines and 800 shot doses – to arrive around mid-November. The campus also will likely receive a second allotment in December.

According to Dr. Michael Carbuto, CSULB's director of student health services, the number of students showing up at the Student Health Center with flu-like illnesses was initially low but is now increasing. Students showing signs of flu-like illness are assumed to have H1N1 because the seasonal flu generally runs from November through April.

"We are seeing an increasing number of ill students, but we've had no major breakouts with any of our athletic teams, in student housing or in campus fraternity or sorority houses," Carbuto said. "But I believe we're ready if anything major happens. We have our plans in place and are ready to go with them if need be."

When the vaccine does arrive on campus, the university's distribution plan remains the same with priority being given to students living in campus housing as well as those in campus fraternity and sorority houses, student athletes and students with chronic medical conditions such as asthma. Student Health Center and University Police employees also will be given priority.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined that one of the key populations at risk for getting the H1N1 flu are people between the ages of 6 months to 24 years of age, a category most students in campus and Greek housing fall into.

Campus officials, again, are encouraging faculty and staff to contact their individual health care providers to check on the availability of and process for receiving the H1N1 vaccine. Providers such as Kaiser Permanente and Blue Shield are receiving their own allotment of the vaccine for their members/patients, and each has its own plan for distribution.

In the meantime, members of the campus community should continue to practice the critical components of healthy behavior, including frequent hand washing and coughing or sneezing into tissues or clothing. In addition, Carbuto reiterated that any member of the campus community not feeling well should stay at home and remain at home until at least 24 hours after the fever is gone.

Those interested in learning more about the seasonal flu or H1N1 can visit the CDC Web site. The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health also has some good resources to help educate people about the flu and improve healthy habits.

For more information about the H1N1 flu vaccination plan at CSULB, call 562/985-4609 or visit the Student Health Services Web site.

September 29, 2009

H1N1 Flu Vaccine Expected to Arrive at Cal State Long Beach in Mid-October

Student Health Services (SHS) at California State University, Long Beach (CSULB) is expecting some 3,000 doses of the H1N1 vaccine when it becomes available to the public. Currently, the target date for the release of the vaccine is expected to be in mid-October.

Because of the limited number of vaccines available, CSULB health center officials, in collaboration with Long Beach Public Health, have determined that the university's initial allotment of the vaccine will be used primarily for students and employees living or working in the campus' student housing areas, including fraternity and sorority houses.

"The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have determined that one of the key populations at risk for getting the H1N1 flu are people between the ages of 6 months to 24 years. Most of the students who live in our campus housing facilities fall within that age group," said Dr. Michael Carbuto, director of student health services and chief of the medical staff. "Because of the close living quarters, close contact and the potential for the spread of the flu among these students, which we have already heard about at other college and universities across the country, we will focus our initial vaccination efforts on students living in campus housing and fraternity and sorority houses."

Last spring, a CSULB student living in campus housing was the first confirmed case of H1N1 (swine flu) in Los Angeles County. She was immediately isolated from other housing students, and the room and other areas she used were cleaned and disinfected. There was no spread of the flu to other students in this case. There were two additional confirmed student cases of H1N1 in the late spring and early summer. Neither of these cases was related to the student living in campus housing.

Faculty and staff are being encouraged to contact their individual health care providers to check on the availability of and process for receiving the H1N1 vaccine. Health care providers such as Kaiser Permanente and Blue Shield will be receiving their own allotment of the vaccine, and each provider is coming up with its own plan for distribution.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have recommended that H1N1 vaccination efforts focus on the following five key populations:

  • People between the ages of 6 months through 24 years of age;
  • Health care and emergency services personnel;
  • Pregnant women;
  • People who live with or care for children younger than 6 months of age;
  • People from ages 25 through 64 years who are at higher risk for complications from pandemic H1N1 flu infection because of chronic health disorders or compromised immune systems.

"It is important to note that illness from the pandemic H1N1 flu has been mostly mild. The vast majority of cases have gotten better without the need to see a health care provider or receive special treatment," Carbuto pointed out. "Those individuals within the at-risk populations as identified by the CDC should seriously consider getting the H1N1 vaccination."

Because it is impossible to know where the flu virus might be contacted, Carbuto wanted to emphasize to the campus community the importance of practicing the critical components of healthy behavior. These practices include frequent hand washing, coughing or sneezing into tissues or clothing, getting enough exercise and sleep, and eating good foods.

People should also know the signs and symptoms of the flu, both seasonal and H1N1. Symptoms for both strains are similar and include fever with a cough and/or sore throat. Other symptoms of influenza-like illness include body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. H1N1may also cause diarrhea and vomiting.

"It is also important to reiterate that if you are not feeling well – whether you are a student, a faculty member or a staff member – you should not be in class or at work," Carbuto added. "In fact, anyone with flu or flu-like illness should go home and stay home for at least 24 hours after the fever is gone."

The campus community will be informed when the H1N1 flu vaccine is available.

Those interested in learning more about the seasonal flu or H1N1 can visit the CDC Web site. The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health also has some good resources to help educate people about the flu and improve healthy habits.

For more information about the H1N1 flu vaccination plan at CSULB, call 562/985-4609 or visit the Student Health Services Web site.

September 28, 2009

Student Health Services will offer four regular seasonal flu shot clinics for members of the Cal State Long Beach campus community.

Please note the clinics will offer regular seasonal flu vaccinations only, not vaccinations for the H1N1 flu, commonly known as swine flu.

The clinics will be held in Ballroom "B" of the University Student Union on Tuesday, Sept. 29 from 1 – 5 p.m.; Thursday, Oct. 1 from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.; Tuesday, Oct. 13 from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.; and Thursday, Oct. 15 from 1 – 5 p.m. No appointment is necessary. The cost to receive a vaccination is $10 and cash, check and credit card payments will be accepted.

"The flu season is upon us, and while we are hearing a lot about H1N1, strains of seasonal flu are also circulating," said Dr. Michael Carbuto, director of Student Health Services and chief of CSULB's medical staff. "The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health is urging everyone to be vaccinated for seasonal flu this year."

The clinics are open to CSULB students, faculty and staff. For more information, call 562/985-4609 or visit www.csulb.edu/shs.

July 1, 2009

The university has received word that the participant of a CSULB summer program in China who was diagnosed with H1N1, also known as swine flu, is fully recovered and has been released from the hospital. Additionally, all members of the summer program who were quarantined in China as a health precaution were released from quarantine. No additional members became ill and everyone has returned to full participation in the study program.

June 26, 2009

A participant of a CSULB summer program in China has been hospitalized with a confirmed case of H1N1, also known as swine flu. As a precautionary measure, all other members of the summer program have been placed in quarantine in a hotel. University sources in China have reported that the ill participant is recovering satisfactorily. Those who are under quarantine are continuing to complete their coursework using online capabilities, are able to communicate easily with each other by phone and are in good spirits. The university is tracking their welfare as closely possible.

Once again we are reminded that the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared an international H1N1 pandemic. Wherever you are, please remember to practice those health habits that are recognized to be most helpful in terms of protection from the flu.

June 11, 2009

Today, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the global outbreak of H1N1 (Novel Influenza A) a pandemic, raising the international health alert to Level 6. The move by WHO was made in response to the geographic spread of the virus around the globe, even though the illness has remained mild to moderate in the majority of cases. To date, the virus, also known as swine flu, has been reported in 74 countries.

In response to the raised alert level, Dr. Mark Horton, director of the California Department of Public Health, reported that the state has prepared for pandemic influenza and has been actively responding to cases in the state as they are reported.

CSULB also is actively monitoring the virus and continues its partnership with the Long Beach Public Health Department in considering the health concerns of our community.

June 1, 2009

The university has received word that the Centers for Disease Control have determined that the second student diagnosed "presumptive positive" did test positive for Novel Influenza A (H1N1), also known as "swine flu."

The student went to Student Health Services last week when she experienced flu-like symptoms, was tested, treated and sent home. Because of the initial "presumptive positive" test result, the university notified all faculty and classmates who may have been in contact with her during the time she may have been contagious so they would know to seek medical assistance if they began showing flu symptoms. Throughout her illness, the student remained under the care of CSULB Health Center physicians. She is now fully recovered and has been cleared to return to her day-to-day activities.

This second confirmed case of H1N1 flu at our university points to the continued need for all of us to recognize the symptoms of flu: fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue with some people experiencing diarrhea and vomiting. This is also an important reminder that practice of healthy habits must occur every day: wash your hands carefully and often; sneeze or cough into tissues or clothing; eat healthful foods and get plenty of rest; and avoid those who are sick.

Summer months are those when some of us get what are known as "summer colds." Know the difference between cold and flu symptoms; if your symptoms are flu-like, seek medical attention.

Your attention and cooperation is important and appreciated.

May 21, 2009

Last evening the university was informed that a second student has been diagnosed "presumptive positive" for H1N1. While final test results will not be available for several days, the Long Beach Health Department considers this a probable case of Novel Influenza A (H1N1), also known as "swine fu." The student was tested and treated for flu-like symptoms by Student Health Services and was sent home. The university is in the process of notifying all faculty and class members who may have been in contact with the student during the period of possible contagion; the student does not live on campus.

It is extremely important for all of us to understand that the threat represented by H1N1 has not abated. As of today, the World Health Organization reports more than 10,000 cases worldwide, with the largest number of cases now in the United States where nearly 5,500 cases of H1N1 are now tallied by the Centers for Disease Control. These numbers continue to increase daily.

CSULB is committed to the health of every individual. For this reason, we are continuing our close partnership with the Long Beach Public Health Department and are monitoring the situation on a daily basis. We encourage students demonstrating flu-like symptoms to visit Student Health Services and advise those who are sick not to come to work.

As many members of our university community are preparing to enjoy the summer away from the campus, and others will continue their work and study here, it is worth the cautionary note to maintain all healthy practices. Wash your hands carefully and often; sneeze or cough into tissues or clothing; eat good foods and get plenty of rest; and avoid contact with those who are sick. If you have flu-like symptoms, especially if you are running a fever, seek medical attention.

Continued attention to your health and that of those around you is greatly appreciated.

May 8, 2009

We are happy to report that our student who was confirmed to have swine flu (H1N1) has been fully evaluated and medically cleared to return to her room in the residence hall. She also will begin her classes once again on Monday. She is well and ready to continue her studies.

We have also learned that the Long Beach Public Health Department has deactivated its Department Operations Center, an indication that the rate of flu cases being reported is considered normal for this time of the year. Additionally, public health officials have determined that to date this flu has not been as serious as they were initially concerned it might be.

Even so, it is important that all of us continue to follow the healthy habits that have been our focus over the past two weeks: frequent hand washing, coughing into tissues or clothing, getting adequate rest and eating good foods. We continue to request that if you have flu-like symptoms, do not come to class or work and seek medical assistance, either from your personal physician or from Student Health Services if you are a student.

Your continued cooperation in considering your health, as well as others’, is greatly appreciated.

May 4, 2009

Today the California Department of Public Health reported that the City of Long Beach has five confirmed cases of swine flu, including the student at CSULB. As is true of our student, the other Long Beach cases involve young people who have not required hospitalization and are recovering well. Our student has remained in isolation since first visiting Student Health Services a week ago, and has not been in contact with campus members other than those responsible for monitoring and caring for her health and welfare.

Today the Long Beach Public Health Department requested that all campus individuals assist them in tracking possible flu cases in our region. If you have taken time off from class or work in the past several days because you experienced flu-like symptoms, the Health Department has requested that you provide the following information to Student Health Services whether you are a student, faculty or staff member:

  • if you have stayed home with flu-like symptoms, what your symptoms were and how long you did not come to campus, and
  • whether you visited your personal physician (if you are not a student who visited Student Health Services)

To report this information, simply call the Student Health Services Hotline at 562-985-4609. Flu-like symptoms, which are the same for swine flu as for seasonal flu, include fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue, with some people also experiencing diarrhea and vomiting.

We join the Long Beach Health Department in reminding everyone that prevention of disease is the result of practicing good health habits such as frequent hand washing, covering coughs and sneezes with tissues or clothing, avoiding close contact with people who are sick, and staying away from class or work if you are not feeling well.

We will keep you informed as new information becomes available.

May 3, 2009

Late yesterday the university received word that the Centers for Disease Control have confirmed that the student who had received a "probable positive" test result did in fact have swine flu.

From the time this student first visited Student Health Services with flu-like symptoms, she was isolated from others on campus as a precautionary measure - as were other students who were also being tested throughout the week. We believe that due to the combination of her quick visit to the Health Center and the follow-up care and monitoring she has received, this student has fared well through her flu and is recovering. She has not been in contact with others and, importantly, every other student's possible flu test that was forwarded to the Public Health Department for evaluation was found negative.

From the beginning of international concerns about swine flu, CSULB has taken proactive precautionary measures to protect the campus community as well as possible. Because it is impossible to know where the flu virus might be contacted - anywhere at all - it is vitally important that all of us remember to practice the critical components of healthy behavior at this time. The routines of frequent hand washing, coughing or sneezing into tissues or clothing, getting enough exercise and sleep, and eating good foods can't be emphasized enough. It is also important to reiterate that if you are not feeling well, you should not be in class or at work, and you should seek medical attention.

CSULB will continue to work closely with the Long Beach Public Health Department in monitoring and addressing as necessary swine flu concerns in our area.

May 1, 2009

We are happy to report that the latest test results of samples taken from students demonstrating flu-like symptoms have all been found negative for swine flu. While additional students' samples have been forwarded to the Long Beach Public Health Department for initial testing, thus far CSULB continues to have no new "probable positive" swine flu cases beyond the one student who was first tested on Monday. We have been advised that final confirmation on that case from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) will not be available until this weekend at the earliest.

We are also happy to report that the student who received the "probable positive" test result earlier this week is recovering and doing very well from what has been a mild illness.

Because no new cases have been identified, CSULB will operate on a business as usual basis, with classes continuing to be offered. However, it remains important for those individuals who have flu-like symptoms to stay away from class, campus, or the workplace and to seek medical attention. It also remains very important that everyone exhibits safe and healthy habits in order to prevent catching or spreading any sickness. These habits include:

  • Washing hands regularly with soap and water or use a hand sanitizer frequently.
  • Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.
  • Staying home from work or class if you are sick and seek medical assistance.
  • Covering your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze; or cough or sneeze into clothing sleeves if possible.
  • Avoiding close social interaction in large groups.
  • Eating healthy food, drink plenty of water, exercise, get plenty of rest, do not smoke and avoid alcoholic beverages.

To ensure that medical services are available to students through the weekend, hours at Student Health Services have been extended through the weekend. The Student Health Center will be open today until 3 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. until noon.

To assist members in the community to better understand swine flu, the Long Beach Health Department has provided an information line with 24-hour prerecorded information at 562-570-4499.

CSULB will continue to move quickly and prudently to serve the best interests of our students, faculty and staff. We appreciate everyone's individual role in helping to keep all students, faculty and staff healthy.

April 30, 2009

Nationally, swine flu has taken center stage as more cases have been reported across the country. At CSULB, we are continuing to work closely with the Long Beach Health Department to care for members of our community. As an important part of this process, we will provide updated information related to the campus on a regular basis.

While we are waiting to learn whether the student who had a “probable positive” test is actually confirmed as a case of swine flu, we have continued to see students in Student Health Services. Several students have been tested for swine flu based on their symptoms, and of those whose tests results have been returned to the university, there have been no additional “probable positive” reports. It is possible, however, that the students who tested negative for swine flu may in fact have another strain of influenza which is very common this time of year. Further tests will be conducted to determine whether this is the case for a couple of individual students.

Because the student who received the “probable positive” test lives on campus, we have arranged for health educators from the Long Beach Public Health Department to conduct information sessions on swine flu and other forms of more common influenza that apparently are impacting the health of our students and other campuses.

One of the most important messages we can provide at this time is to recognize flu-like symptoms and to seek medical assistance immediately if you believe you may have them. In order to accommodate students who may have these symptoms, CSULB Student Health Services has expanded the hours of service through this weekend. The Health Center will be open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Friday, and from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday and Sunday. Please remember, if you are sick, do not come to class or work at this time, and do not return to class or work until you are fully recovered. This is a very unique and cautionary period, and for this reason, I am requesting faculty to exercise lenience and flexibility on attendance policies so that students do not believe they must attend class even if they are sick or exhibit flu-like symptoms. I also ask that all campus managers exhibit flexibility and consideration for employees needing time off for illness.

We are focused on the health and welfare of our entire university community and appreciate the extra care individuals are taking at this time. Please do not underestimate the importance of exhibiting healthy habits in order to prevent catching or spreading the flu.

Healthy Habits Include:

  • Washing hands regularly with soap and water or use a hand sanitizer frequently.
  • Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.
  • Staying home from work or class if you are sick and seek medical assistance.
  • Covering your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze; or cough or sneeze into clothing sleeves if possible.
  • Avoiding close social interaction in large groups.
  • Eating healthy food, drink plenty of water, exercise, get plenty of rest, do not smoke and avoid alcoholic beverages.

April 29, 2009

Late Tuesday evening we were informed by the Long Beach Health Department that a CSULB student received a "probable positive" test result for swine flu.

Final determination of the test results will not be available for another two days.

The student, who is a resident of the Los Alamitos Residence Hall, first felt ill on Sunday, and went to Student Health Services to see a doctor on Monday. Because the symptoms matched those related to swine flu, precautionary arrangements were immediately made for the student’s roommate to stay elsewhere. In addition to residents of Los Alamitos Hall, the student’s classmates and faculty are being notified. The affected individual is currently isolated while recuperating from an apparently mild case of this disease. It is also important to note that the student has not attended classes this week.

It is extremely important for all of us to be careful of health concerns at this time. This means that if you are feeling flu-like symptoms, you should not come to class or to work. The symptoms that the Centers for Disease Control have connected with swine flu are fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue, with some people also experiencing diarrhea and vomiting. Please see your personal physician, or if you are a student visit the Student Health Center if you are experiencing these symptoms. We are also responsible for practicing good health habits: wash your hands carefully and frequently, remain physically active, drink plenty of fluids and eat nutritious foods. Avoid close contact with those who are sick.

CSULB is committed to keeping you informed at this time. A hotline, 562-985-1460, will be available for answering questions specific to swine flu later today; and information posted directly from the Centers for Disease Control, the World Health Organization and the California Department of Public Health are available on the university’s Web site home page under “Medical Advisory.” Campus updates will also be available on the Web site.

At this time, U.S. cases of swine flu have been mild, and available antivirals have been effective in combating the disease. We are continuing to monitor the situation and are working closely with the Long Beach Department of Health to benefit the health and welfare of our community.

Thank you for your continued concern and cooperation.

April 27, 2009

The World Health Organization, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control have advised caution related to a newly identified strain of swine flu. Individual cases have been reported in the United States, including California, as well as in other parts of the world, particularly Mexico.

At California State University, Long Beach, we wish to advise all members of our community to practice ongoing good health habits. If you experience any of the symptoms of swine flu, which closely resemble the symptoms of seasonal flu viruses, please do not come to class or work; seek medical attention from your personal physician or Student Health Services if you are a student; and do not return to class or work until you are well.

Symptoms

Symptoms related to swine flu include fever, chills, headache, sore throat and runny nose; some individuals also experience vomiting and/or diarrhea.

Habits

The Long Beach Health Department has advised the following habits to prevent catching or spreading the flu:

  • Wash hands with soap and water or a hand sanitizer frequently.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home from work or school if you are sick.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze; or cough or sneeze into your sleeve.
  • Eat healthy food, drink plenty of water, exercise, get plenty of rest, do not smoke and avoid alcoholic beverages.

Long Beach Public Health Infoline

562-570-4499

(24-hour Recorded Message)

Student Health Center Hours

Monday - Tuesday - Thursday
8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Wednesday
10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Friday
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Additional Information

Updated information about swine flu is available from the following sources:

Swine Flu Virus seen under electron microscope

Electron microscope image of the reassorted N1H1 virus from wikipedia.org.